Another interview with an author for you today folks, we bring you an interview with Martini Fisher, Author of “Time Maps: Australia, Early Sea Voyages and invasions”. Please enjoy the interview and don’t forget to share the post and please leave some comments in the comment section below.

Ok folks, enjoy the read.

Questions we’ve been discussing:

Q. What inspired you to write your first book?

A. Martini Fisher (Mythographer, Author)

What inspired me to write my first book was actually my third book, if that makes sense. I started making my little contributions for “Time Maps”, the series of books I wrote with Dr. R.K. Fisher long before I wrote “The Three Realms”, which is the first book I wrote by myself. The purpose of my first book, apart from re-telling ancient mythology that I was familiar with and that hasn’t really been told before, was to prepare and familiarize myself with the publishing industry; how it all works, how to promote, how to network, how to deal with all its quirks and challenges, and so on. “The Three Realms” was meant to be a short book on Javanese Creation Myth which would introduce me to this new world of publishing and get my name out there, so that when “Time Maps” are published, I know what I need to do to promote it to the best of my ability. However, “The Three Realms” turned out to be reasonably well-received, so I wrote a sequel called “Kings and Giants”, and made them into a series called “Wayang: Stories of the Shadow Puppets” with a vision of it being a four-books series. It was only after “Kings and Giants” that the first book of the “Time Maps” series was published.

Q. Tell us a little more about your new book?

A. Martini Fisher (Mythographer, Author)

My new book is the second installment of “Time Maps” called “Australia, Early Sea Voyages and Invasions” which I wrote with Dr. R.K. Fisher, a mathematician. What we’re trying to do is to combine both our expertise to revisit developments & impacts of civilizations, migrations, leaders and continents. We’ve done our individual researches on societies, dynasties, heroes, kings and eras looking at ideas, theories & world views in our own ways according to our backgrounds, life and academic experiences and combined them in “Time Maps”. So what the readers will get from “Time Maps” is what happens when a mathematician and a mythographer/historian start questioning the history we believe in and sometimes take for granted. In “Australia, Early Sea Voyages and Invasions”, we talk about evidences of early people and sea travels. We look at the Megalithic Culture, Kurgans and Indoeuropeans, Indoeuropeans and Sumerian Invasions, and of course Australia. We believe that, despite the modern invention of the internet, we are in fact not more “connected” than our ancestors. In this book we also touch on the impact of revolution in ancient Egypt and some ancient politics that I think could have easily find their places in our modern lives today.

Q. Do you have a specific writing style?

A. Martini Fisher (Mythographer, Author)

I have been told that my writing style is “overly-simplified”, and I take that as a compliment. I write non-fiction historical and mythological books, and I have a rather extensive background on the subjects with a lot of journals, books and references in my disposal, so it’s easy, I suppose, to go off in a tangent and sound “academic-y”, but I try not to do that, because my purpose is to show how relatable my subjects are to people who don’t necessarily have the same level of interest in mythology or ancient history as I do, and how close to life those subjects really are.

Q. What books have most influenced your life most?

A. Martini Fisher (Mythographer, Author)

I will always say that Robert Graves have changed my life. I read his novel, “I, Claudius” when I was, maybe, 11 years old and I knew then that whatever this man was doing, I want to do it too. Since then, I think I have read every books he has written and translated, and “The Greek Myths” is still one of my favorite books of all time.

Q. Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

A. Martini Fisher (Mythographer, Author)

I don’t get to read works by the new authors very often, as I have a few writings in the works and they are all historical, so anything modern that I read usually relates to them, but I have been enjoying some of the shifter romance novels that are out there at the moment. I didn’t even know what a shifter novel was this time last year, but I think they’re brilliant.

Q. If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

A. Martini Fisher (Mythographer, Author)

I wouldn’t change the content for the world. I’ve always been very proud of “Time Maps” and I believe that, even if the writing style or the content isn’t perfect, history is not about perfection. Realistically, you can never get history exactly right. For me, and I can speak for Dr. Fisher as well, history in its presentation should open a discussion, not a lesson. If you disagree with how we re-tell an event then that’s good, you can question it, find out more about it, and discuss it with us, or with someone else, then together we can maybe take a step closer into the closest version of event in the past. If I change anything it would probably be little tweaks in its presentation. For example, clickable links on the ebooks, better formatting and so on, which I do periodically.

Q. Do you have any advice for other writers?

A. Martini Fisher (Mythographer, Author)

It’s not enough to just write. My advice is to approach writing as how you would approach a business. Your writing is your product, so of course you’ll want tomake sure you put out great products to the market. Ask questions, and find out anything and everything you can about the business surrounding it, such as copyright, promotion, design, networking, sales and so on. Know your obligations and your rights, and know how to protect your product (your books) and investment (your time, your expertise etc). As an author, you are your own boss, so now is a good time to learn, grow and start acting like a boss. You deserve it. No one knows your books like you do.

Q. What were the challenges (research, literary, psychological, and logistical) in bringing it to life?

A. Martini Fisher (Mythographer, Author)

In referencing ancient works, research is always a challenge. The obvious one is translation. There are many good translations available out there of great writers such as Homer or Suetonius. I am reasonably adept at translating Latin and Ancient Greek to English, and between the two of us, we are proficient in three ancient languages and six modern languages, but even then we still need help. The difficult part is to put these writings in the context of the time. Like all languages, there are always subtexts and different meanings. You also need to take into account who the contemporary historian was and what his role was in the time that he lived in, because that influences how he tells the story. This is why I am always adamant that it is not possible to “get it right” when it comes to history. The only people who would get it right would have been the ones who’d lived through it, and most of them are dead now. And even then, the way they would respond and eventually re-tell the event would vary depending on their backgrounds, their experiences, their mindsets, their loyalty and many other factors. Sometimes I’d get to look at three or four completely different accounts on how an ancient war happens and try to find what I would think is the closest to the truth out of those accounts. It’s like looking at a giant jigsaw puzzle that I can put together in a variety of different ways, and even then I can be sure that it would not be exactly what happened at the time.

Karen Woodham
Karen Woodham is the founder and owner of the Blazing Minds. She is also a Cinema reviewer, based at the Scala in Prestatyn and also works with RealD 3D reviewing the latest 3D releases, she has also had several articles published in various publications. In 2015 she became an Award Winning Blogger and also has her website listed as one of the UK's Top 10 Film Blogs.
Karen Woodham